Tai Chi Movements: Fu Zhongwen's Traditional Yang Style Taijiquan

Fu Zhongwen (1903-1994) is one of the most renowned, accomplished, and important figures for today’s Yang style taijiquan (and for the world tai chi community in general).

Fu ZhongwenFu Zhongwen Yang Style Taijiquan

Zhongwen was born in the village of Guanfu in Yong Nian County, Hebei Province … the birthplace of Yang Lu Chan & the cradle of Yang style taijiquan. Grandmaster Fu was apprenticed to Yang Lu Chan’s most famous grandson, Yang Chengfu, at the tender age of 9 (in 1913). It was with Great Grandmaster Yang Chengfu that Zhongwen travelled around china, to Hong Kong, Tianjing, Wuhan, Guangzhou, Beijing, and more. During these travels, Yang Chengfu would teach & Fu Zhongwen would demonstrate. Fu Zhongwen would also …

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Study Guide to Taijiquan Fajin (Fa Chin ... or 'Fa Jing') - Part Two

The most popular topic of reading & discussion on this website is tai chi “fajing” (a technically incorrect spelling / concept). As such, I am going to build & refine this extensive online fajin study guide, for my fellow taijiquan enthusiasts to consider and comment.

Before I provide some of my own analysis on several fajin demos of accomplished taijiquan masters … we need to review the basics.

Cheng Man Ching's Fajin (or "Fajing")

The Basics of Taiji Fajin

First of all, the “correct” translation would be taiji fajin (pinyin) … tai chi fa chin (Wade-Giles) … or 太極發勁 (Mandarin).

I get the impression — quite often — that many western taiji practitioners feel that “fa jin” is …

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"Internal" Power vs. "External" Power

This debate will probably never end … and the question will probably never be fully answered:

What exactly is the difference between the internal and external martial arts?

While I certainly can provide no definitive answer, I thought it might be helpful to share a bit of what I’ve learned in my experience with the Chinese internal martial arts, and particularly the distinction between jìn (勁) and lì (力).

First of all, an important linguistic note from native Chinese speaker & master taijiquan practitioner, Zhang Yun’s article on Li & Types of Jin in Taijiquan.

“In everyday usage, both of these words mean physical force, and can be used interchangeably. Very often, people use jin to denote a very large force.

In martial art, these are technical terms with more precise definitions. Li is simple muscular force, what we call “untrained force”, …

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Chen Yu Taijiquan Yong Fa (Chen Yu Tai Chi Applications)

Everyone in the world of taiji quan must show respect & admiration to Chen style tai chi. As the forebear of taijiquan (by many historical accounts), Chen family Patriarch Chen Wang Ting was perhaps the originator of tai chi as we know it. The Chen family “cannon fist” style, and its unique development of a specific kind of internal power, has evolved over the last 500 years into the many various styles of tai chi as we recognize them today.

Chen Wang Ting Statue

<<< Chen family patriarch Chen Wang Ting (1580–1660) >>>

While there are many parallel stories of the development of taijiquan, all the modern styles of taijiquan officially or unofficially credit the Chen family style as their …

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The Modern Taoist Alchemist: Huang Xing Xian

Back! For the first post with the new blog style, and a renewed energy for this site … … I am dedicating this to one of the great grandmasters of our time: Huang Xingxian or Huang Sheng Shyan. Huang Sheng Shyan (Huang XingXian)
Master Huang’s martial arts training began with “one of the last great Fujian White Crane masters”1, Xie Zhongqian. In fact, Huang learned White Crane Boxing (baihe quan), 18 Buddha Boxing / Arhat Boxing (luohan quan), and Neigong all from master Xie. Huang also studied further Fujian White Crane style, as well as Traditional Chinese Medicine and the Literary Classics from his teacher Pan Chun Nien. …

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Developing Fa Jin (Fajing or Fa Chin) - Part One

I know there is a lot of interest out there on the tai chi fajin training and developing fa jin (also seen spelled as fa chin or fajing [which is wrong... keep reading]). What exactly is a fajin? Simply, “fa jin” means to issue force/ power. Many confuse this concept with what a “fa jing,” an incorrect translation, would mean, which is a transfer or release of “jing.” As many practitioners of Chinese arts are aware, “jing” means literally our ‘essence’ or ‘life-force.’ It seems that because of this common mis-translation, many have imagined the fajin to be some mystical issuance of intangible energy. This is far from the case!

In actuality, a fajin is just a very well co-ordinated release of good old fashioned Newtonian power. Granted, the way a taiji player uses the body to issue this force may make it seem mystical or mysterious when you watch, it is in …

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Tai Chi Movements - Wu Style Long Form Tai Chi Video

This is the Wu Style tai chi form as practiced and taught by master Wu Yinghua (as seen in the 1st-3rd videos). This is the Wu style that was also taught by Ma Yueh Liang, who we will continue to add more and more videos from. Masters Wu Yinghua and Ma Yueh Liang were two of the taiji legends of modern Chinese martial arts. Not only did they author several classic and many now out of print texts such as: Wu Style Taichichuan : Forms, Concepts and Application of the Original Style and Wu Style Taichichuan They also brought this Wu Style to a huge number of people all over the world. I am learning this form right now in Southern California. …

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